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Emergency


Emergency

Students who are experiencing a life threatening emergency should always call 911

Psychological Emergencies (Monday-Friday 8:15am-4:45pm)

If you or someone you know is experiencing a crisis or a psychological emergency when CCPPS is open (Monday -Friday 8:15 am -4:45) call or visit the CCPPS office at 304-293-4431. Students can talk with a counselor at our Drop-In Hours without a scheduled appointment.

If you or someone else is experiencing a potentially life threatening situation and in need of immediate attention call either 911 or the University Police Department at 304-293-COPS (2677).

After-Hours/Weekend Psychological Emergencies:

If you or someone you know is experiencing a crisis or a psychological emergency call the Carruth Center for Psychological and Psychiatric Services (CCPPS) office at 304-293-4431 to speak with an after-hours counselor.

Note: this service is not designed to receive or respond to messages regarding scheduling concerns or prescriptions.

If you or someone else is experiencing a potentially life threatening situation and in need of immediate attention call either 911 or the University Police Department at 304-293-COPS (2677).

If you or someone you know is feeling suicidal, the hotlines below can also provide assistance:

- National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

- Military Veterans Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (Press 1)

-Trevor Project Hotline (LGBTQ): 1-866-4UTREVOR (1-866-488-7386)

Warning Signs of Suicidal Behavior

These signs may mean that someone is at risk for suicide. Risk is greater if the behavior is new, or has increased, and if it seems related to a painful event, loss, or change:

- Talking about wanting to die or kill oneself

- Looking for a way to kill oneself

- Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live

- Talking about feeling trapped or being in unbearable pain

- Talking about being a burden to others

- Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs

- Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly

- Sleeping too little or too much

- Withdrawing or feeling isolated

- Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge

- Displaying extreme mood swings

What You Can Do

If you believe someone may be thinking about suicide:

- Ask them if they are thinking about killing themselves. (This will not put the idea into their head or make it more likely that they will attempt suicide.)

- Listen without judging and show you care.

- Stay with the person (or make sure the person is in a private, secure place with another caring person) until you can get further help.

- Remove any objects that could be used in a suicide attempt.

- Call the Carruth Center for Psychological and Psychiatric Services (CCPPS) office at 304-293-4431 to speak with a counselor (24/7)

- Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and follow their guidance.

- If danger for self-harm seems imminent, call 911 or the University Police Department 304-293-COPS (2677).



The hotlines below may be beneficial for specific populations:

Military Veterans Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (Press 1)

Trevor Project Hotline (LGBTQ): 1-866-4UTREVOR (1-866-488-7386)